Our March

TONIGHT AT THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL AT 7:00 PM-1/12/2017 CAPTAIN THOMAS A. O’NEIL AND SPC. MARCEL BRIDGEWATER TO SPEAK AT NOYES HISTORY CENTER’S AMBRECHT ROOM.

Captain O’Neil describing the January 2nd to 3rd reenactment and story

Thomas O’Neil, Leo Bridgewater, and about ten marchers will attempt to recreate the route Ezekiel Anderson took when leading about five thousand troops around the British.  Dedicated in 1914, twelve obelisks of granite are set in various places along the route to commemorate and honor the men who fought three battles in eight days and defeated the British each time.  When they began the March, according to historian Roger Williams, the temperature was about 27 degrees Fahrenheit, and by morning it dipped to 24 degrees, which was enough to allow the troops to cart two cannons over swampy ground near the current Youngs Road without getting caught in the mud and low water.  They were gambling that the British might think they were still in Trenton, huddling near their fires, but the path Anderson chose for them allowed the Yankees to edge around the British regulars and loyalists and back into the small road behind the Thomas Clarke house into high ground.  The plan is to leave the same time as his great-great-great-great-great grandfather did, around midnight and arrive in the early morning hours of January 3rd.  This is as much a spiritual journey for O’Neil as it is a physical one, and Team Ezekiel’s reminder is that we are all in this together, just as we were on that cold night in January, 1777.

capt_william_shippenGrave of  Captain William Shippen, first Marine ever to die in a land-base action,  at the Battle of Princeton. Captain Shippen is buried in Philadelphia.

Click here for the  turn by turn March from the SBC Sun Center on Hamilton Avenue to the Princeton Battlefield Park   Thanks to Tom Glover, Hamilton historical chief, and Roger Williams, writer, historian, and we salute each of them for their assistance in this map, which more closely articulates the march movements of January 3, 1777.